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Curious By Nature Events and Exhibits

Upcoming Events

June 3 @ 5:30pm    Late Spring Wildflowers - ONLINE, NOT in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled.  However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled.

Join me to view some of the late spring wildflowers now in bloom at Ann Lee Pond Nature and Historic Preserve in the Town of Colonie.  Some of those featured will be Blue-eyed Grasses (Sisyrinchium spp.), Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis), Large Blue Flag (Iris versicolor), Smaller Forget-me-not (Myosotis laxa), Swamp Candles (Lysimachia terrestris), Virginia Waterleaf (Hydrophyllum virginianum), and Whorled Loosestrife (Lysimachia quadrifolia).

This online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the ~30-minute presentation. Be sure to grab your favorite beverage and a bag of popcorn before you get comfy prior to the presentation.

Join this Zoom meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/76348639093

Meeting ID: 763 4863 9093

Password: 7T3J0S

“See” you then!

Please logon to this presentation to see these blooming beauties before they disappear for another year!

 

July 29 @ 5:30pm   Foraging for Wild Edibles: Highbush Blueberry - ONLINE, NOT in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled. However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled.

This online event is the second of six in a series of virtual walks that will focus on Foraging for Wild Edibles.

This virtual walk will feature Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) that can be found bearing ripe fruit at this time throughout Ann Lee Pond Nature and Historic Preserve in the Town of Colonie. The online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the information-packed ~10-minute presentation.

If you have an interest in foraging for wild edibles, please join me for all six episodes of this series of “walks.” The four subsequent sessions will each feature different plants and, over the course of this series, you’ll learn about edible plant parts, including leaves, roots, stems and fruits (both fleshy and nuts).

For each online session, please be prompt and please understand that no more than 100 of us may participate.

To join this Zoom Meeting:
https://us04web.zoom.us/j/77488033275

Meeting ID: 774 8803 3275

Password: 7T3J0S

“See” you then!

Why forage? Foraging feeds us – literally and figuratively. Foraging helps to fill our freezer and pantry without us planting seeds or spending dollars. Foraging helps us to better understand the earth and more about our sense of place on it. Foraging anchors us in the season – it helps us to be mindful of the now.

Blueberries are often called a superfood because they are high in nutrients and antioxidants, low in calories, and have proven health benefits such as helping to maintain brain function and in fighting urinary tract infections. We will review where to find Highbush Blueberry.

After we locate this targeted species, we’ll briefly discuss a few identification tips, its edibility, and some sample recipes.

Please logon to this presentation to learn more about this easy to find and identify and tasty wild fruit!

 

Aug 26 @ 5:30pm   Foraging for Wild Edibles: Hazelnuts - ONLINE, NOT in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled. However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled.

This online event is the third of six in a series of virtual walks that will focus on Foraging for Wild Edibles.

Why forage? Foraging feeds us – literally and figuratively. Foraging helps to fill our freezer and pantry without us planting seeds or spending dollars. Foraging helps us to better understand the earth and more about our sense of place on it. Foraging anchors us in the season – it helps us to be mindful of the now.

From starters to salads, from fresh pasta to desserts, or whether your cuisine is Asian or European, there is no course that cannot be improved by a few chopped hazelnuts. This virtual walk will feature American Hazelnut (Corylus americana) whose ripened nuts can be found at this time along some of the towpaths of the Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve in the Town of Clifton Park. The online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the information-packed ~15-minute presentation.

If you have an interest in foraging for wild edibles, please join me for all six episodes of this series of “walks.” The three subsequent sessions will each feature different plants and, over the course of this series, you’ll learn about edible plant parts, including leaves, roots, stems and fruits (both fleshy and nuts).

For each online session, please be prompt and please understand that no more than 100 of us may participate.

Join this Zoom meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/78659031385
Meeting ID: 786 5903 1385
Password: 4WV4Nm

“See” you then!

Please logon to this presentation to learn more about this easy to find and identify and tasty wild nuts that you can use to make delicious baked goods, or even a liqueur!

 

Sept 9 @ 5:30pm    Foraging for Wild Edibles: Nannyberry - ONLINE, NOT in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled. However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled.

This online event is the fourth of six in a series of virtual walks that will focus on Foraging for Wild Edibles.

Why forage? Foraging feeds us – literally and figuratively. Foraging helps to fill our freezer and pantry without us planting seeds or spending dollars. Foraging helps us to better understand the earth and more about our sense of place on it. Foraging anchors us in the season – it helps us to be mindful of the now.

Nannyberry is one of the largest of the viburnums. It is admired for its lustrous foliage, its beautiful and abundant flowers, its handsome edible fruit and its brilliant autumnal color. This virtual walk will feature Nannyberry (Viburnum lentago) whose ripened fruit can be found at this time at Garnsey Park in the Town of Clifton Park. The online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the information-packed ~15-minute presentation.

If you have an interest in foraging for wild edibles, please join me for all six episodes of this series of “walks.” The two subsequent sessions will each feature different plants and, over the course of this series, you’ll learn about edible plant parts, including leaves, roots, stems and fruits (both fleshy and nuts).

For each online session, please be prompt and please understand that no more than 100 of us may participate.

Join this Zoom meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/72295753227
Meeting ID: 722 9575 3227
Password: 1Zufub

“See” you then!

Please logon to this presentation to learn more about this easy to find and identify and tasty wild edible fruit that you can use to make delicious jam, fruit leather, sauces, and baked goods, or even as wine!

 

October 3 @ 1pm    Foraging for Wild Edibles: Hickory Nuts - ONLINE, NOT in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled. However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled.

This online event is the fifth of six in a series of virtual walks that will focus on Foraging for Wild Edibles.

Why forage? Foraging feeds us – literally and figuratively. Foraging helps to fill our freezer and pantry without us planting seeds or spending dollars. Foraging helps us to better understand the earth and more about our sense of place on it. Foraging anchors us in the season – it helps us to be mindful of the now.

Even though they grow on trees, hickory nuts technically aren’t tree nuts. They’re drupes, egg-shaped fruits with a fleshy layer surrounding their hard-shelled seeds. In other words, the nutmeats are actually the seeds of a hickory. This virtual walk will feature (1) Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra) and (2) Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata) whose ripened nuts can be found at this time at the 41-acre unnamed property owned by the Town of Clifton Park. The online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the information-packed ~15-minute presentation.

If you have an interest in foraging for wild edibles, please join me for all six episodes of this series of “walks.” The next session is the finale of this series, which has featured different plants and information about edible plant parts, including leaves, roots, stems and fruits (both fleshy and nuts).

For each online session, please be prompt and please understand that no more than 100 of us may participate.

Join this Zoom meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/75058624526
Meeting ID: 750 5862 4526
Password: 4ZSQxY

“See” you then!

Please logon to this presentation to learn more about these easy to find and identify and tasty wild nuts that you can use to make delicious cookies, cakes, brittle, and ice cream, but also in a broth for savory dishes!

 

October 4 @ 1pm    Foraging for Wild Edibles: Autumnberries - ONLINE, NOT in-person!

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our scheduled gathering has been canceled. However, I am inviting you to alternatively join me for a virtual walk – not in person as originally scheduled.

This is the finale of a six-part series of online events about Foraging for Wild Edibles.

Why forage? Foraging feeds us – literally and figuratively. Foraging helps to fill our freezer and pantry without us planting seeds or spending dollars. Foraging helps us to better understand the earth and more about our sense of place on it. Foraging anchors us in the season – it helps us to be mindful of the now.

When mature, these red berries contain carotenoids (which give color to plant parts like ripe tomatoes and autumn leaves), including considerable amounts of lycopene (which is an antioxidant known to have multiple health benefits). This virtual walk will feature Autumn-olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) whose ripened fruit can be found at this time along the Historic Champlain Canalway Trail in the Town of Halfmoon. The online session will last <45 minutes, including an interactive discussion period immediately following the information-packed ~15-minute presentation.

If you have an interest in foraging for wild edibles, please join me for this sixth and final episode of this series of “walks.” In sum, the series has featured different plants and, over its course, provided information about edible plant parts, including leaves, roots, stems and fruits (both fleshy and nuts).

For this online session, please be prompt and please understand that no more than 100 of us may participate.

Join this Zoom meeting: https://us04web.zoom.us/j/71723723871
Meeting ID: 717 2372 3871
Password: 3e8aPx

“See” you then!

Please logon to this presentation to learn more about this easy to find and identify and tasty wild edible fruit that you can use to make delicious jam, fruit leather, sauces, and baked goods, or even in a cocktail or as wine!

Ongoing Exhibits

No exhibits currently underway.

Previous Exhibits

The Town of Clifton Park compiled its 2015 calendar from a selection of winning photos submitted to two photo contests conducted during 2014.  The "Open Space and Nature Day Photo Contest" sought entries from residents and visitors with the goal of encouraging them to enjoy the outdoors.  The second contest, "Art in Everyday Life," sought entries that represented the artist's interpretation of this theme in photographic images.

One of my entries, entitled "Vischer Ferry Sunset," was selected for the December photo of this calendar as a result of it being selected a first place winner in the "Landscapes" category of the Open Space and Nature Day Photo Contest.

 

All entries were photographed at any of eight nature preserves or parks located in the town.  The Open Space and Nature Day was hosted by the Town Board and its Open Space, Trails & Riverfront Advisory Committee on May 17, 2014.

View the 2015 calendar.  Read more about it.

On December 1, 2014, the Town Board recognized the winning entries and the associated artists at the beginning of its regular board meeting with a slide presentation of the calendar's photographs.

 

A two-month exhibit at the former Local.Art.Works gallery in the Jonesville Store in Clifton Park included several of my wildflower and seasonal landscape photos.   

Scenes from the artists' reception -

 

  

 

 

This winter landscape (St. Regis Mountain, part of the Adirondacks), was previously on display as part of the New York State Museum exhibit, entitled "Wish You Were Here!" That exhibition featured photographs submitted from the public-at-large from across New York to illustrate the types of scenes one would expect to see on a postcard that you'd send "back home" to visually capture something memorable from your trip. The exhibit was simultaneous with "Not Just Another Pretty Place: The Landscape of New York."

 

 

This winter image of the Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve, entitled "Shimmering Landscape," received a 2nd Place award in the "Nature" category in the 2009 Clifton Park River Days Photo Contest:

This waterfall image, entitled "Nature's Backlighting:  Azure Cascade," was an unawarded selection in Clifton Park-Halfmoon Public Library's 14th Annual Juried Art and Photography Show:

© David H. Behm / Curious By Nature